House Rules

Action Points

At the beginning of a session or at a full heal-up, you gain one action point (and lose any that you might have stored up). You can spend an action point on your turn to gain an additional standard action (which, as always, you can downgrade to a move action or a quick action). You gain an action point after any combat encounter where the escalation die reaches three.

Action Point Feats

Strong Action

  • Adventurer Tier: When you spend an action point to make an attack, roll the die twice and take the higher result.

Deadly Action

  • Adventurer Tier: When you spend an action point to make an attack and roll a 1 on the damage die, roll it again.

Recovery Action

  • Adventurer Tier: When you spend an action point you can also immediately make a saving throw against a condition that a save can end.

Fortune Cards

At the beginning of a session or at a full heal-up, you receive a fortune card. When you roll a critical hit, you receive another one. Each card has a trigger that tells you when you can play it and an effect that happens then.

Translation

Fortune cards were made for Dungeons & Dragons fourth edition, so they occasionally use terms that aren’t in 13th Age. The table below matches terms used on fortune cards to the corresponding terms in 13th Age. Consider these terms synonymous.

Dungeons & Dragons 4E 13th Age
Adjacent Engaged
Minor action Quick action
Second wind Rally
Healing surge Recovery
Bloodied Staggered
Slowed Stuck

Fortune Card Feats

Aggressive Fortune

  • Adventurer Tier: When you play an attack fortune card, gain a +2 bonus to your next attack roll. If the damage die on that attack comes up as 1, reroll it.

Protective Fortune

  • Adventurer Tier: When you play a defense fortune card, gain a +2 bonus to all defenses for one round.

Cunning Fortune

  • Adventurer Tier: When you play a tactic fortune card, you can disengage without using your move action either before or after the card’s effect.

Fortune Favors the Bold

  • Adventurer Tier: Discard a fortune card to gain an action point.

Overland Travel

Each hexagon covers a half day’s travel. There are a few regions with special DC’s and random encounter tables: the High Road, the Mere of Dead Men, the Sword Mountains, the Crags, and Neverwinter Wood.

Twice per day, you can move from one hex to an adjacent hex by making a skill check. If you fail, you still move into the adjacent hex, but your result is used for a random encounter in the hex you just moved into. If everyone in your party spends a recovery, you can move into a third hex per day. Note, these are calendar days, not full heal-ups.

The High Road: Plagued as it may be with bandits and monsters, travel is still easier on the High Road. You can make three moves per day instead of two, and take a fourth if everyone in the party spends a recovery.

The Sword Mountains, the Crags, Neverwinter Wood, and the Mere of Dead Men: Travel through the mountains, dense forest, or swamp is more difficult. You can make one move per day instead of two, and take a second only if everyone in the party spends a recovery.

Mass Combat

These rules are adapted from 13th Sage’s Mass Combat rules.

From time to time, our heroes lead large numbers of allies against large numbers of enemies. These conflicts often come down to a combat encounter. In these combats, each side has a number of dice used to represent the tide of the larger battle going on around them.

At the start of the combat, the GM assigns between one and three dice to Ally Dice and Enemy Dice. At the beginning of each round, the GM rolls the enemy dice, and another designated player rolls the ally dice.

For each 5 or 6 rolled, each side can choose one:

  • One of your enemies takes normal damage for a single target at your tier (the highest option, where more than one is offered).
  • Increase the escalation die by 1.
  • Remove one die from your enemy’s pool.

PC’s can also choose:

  • One PC can heal using a recovery.
  • One PC gains an action point.
  • One PC gains a Fortune card.

The GM can also choose:

  • One monster gains a number of temporary hit points equal to the normal damage for a single target at your tier (the highest option, where more than one is offered).

When using a 5, you must also pick a drawback:

  • One PC or creature on your side takes normal damage for a single target at your tier (the highest option, where more than one is offered).
  • One PC or creature on your side becomes hampered, stuck, or vulnerable (normal save ends).
  • The enemy holds firm, keeping the escalation die from increasing this round.
  • The enemy pushes forward, reducing your pool by one die.

The GM may expand one, either, or both of these lists to add options for a specific battle.

Curses & Diseases

A PC can be exposed to a curse or disease either by a monster’s attack, an environmental effect, or as the result of a roleplaying decision. Diseases or curses often have multiple stages of increasing severity. At each full heal-up, the character must make a skill check to try to recover from the condition. Diseases usually require Constitution checks, while curses often require Wisdom checks, but that may vary from one condition to the next. This check determines whether the condition worsens, improves, or stays the same.

House Rules

Neverwinter Jason